1. Urban planning can be oddly sexy.

     
  2. Being a fanatic of the Underground, I have of course been watching the recent BBC documentary series The Tube. You should too. It’s great.

    But this is not, oddly, a post about how awesome the tube is - I’m here to extol the virtues of the well-made documentary, a dying breed in the world of mission-docs, edu-tainment and reality tv. There’s something… nice¬†about ‘The Tube’. Whether it’s meeting the cleaner who used to be a professional cyclist, the man who changes the lightbulbs in signals, or seeing the dozens of passed-out revellers waking up bleary-eyed at the end of the Northern Line, it finds modest beauty in the small stories of ordinary people and everyday things. It doesn’t poke fun at its subjects, it doesn’t tell you what to think, and it doesn’t try and construct a story for you to digest. I’m a huge fan of storytelling, but there’s a simple glory to pointing a camera at something and showing it to you. ‘Hey. Look at that: isn’t it interesting?’

    Like the best design, cleaner and simpler documentaries tend to be better documentaries. The Tube is one of them. Take a look.

    (Source: itsallrandominmyhead)

     
  3. These are cute, clean, simple and true.

    makeitm9:

    Underground Annoyances

    Uni project on journey, these are some quick responses I made after asking people what annoys them most on the London Underground.

    (Source: thomasjamesdesign)

     
  4. jonwhitty:

    Poster(s) from Underground.

     

  5. Because it is beautiful.

     
  6. More structures should be fashioned in the shape of oversized domestic objects. A diving board in the shape of a tennis racket. A traffic light like a lolly. A tube station that looks like the inside of a can of baked beans.

    (Source: findthecool, via sintizators)

     
  7. Black and White and Red, a play for two actors I’ve written over the last 2 years, is being staged at the Etcetera Theatre in Camden from the 14th to 19th of June. This is the show’s artwork, based on an orginal work by Burmese artist Htein Lin, whose life inspired the story.

     
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  9. Words cannot describe how much I want this rug.